Announced May 29, a new package of reforms will change laws, change culture and deliver new support for victim survivors when they need it most.

The package will drive action at every stage: better responding to victims when violence occurs, delivering a stronger justice response that holds offenders to account, and continuing Victoria’s world-leading prevention response – stopping violence before it starts.

“When women are still dying at the hands of men – we must do more. From prevention to response to justice, these reforms will target family violence at every stage.” – Premier Jacinta Allan

Click here to read article

DATES RELEASED FOR APRIL & MAY 2024

Do you work with adults using family violence in your role? This new MARAM offering from Safe and Equal is suitable for all professionals who may identify family violence is occurring and who engage with people in a one-off, episodic or ongoing service. This training focuses on working with adults using family violence. 
 
During this training, you will learn to identify indicators for a person likely to be using family violence by observation of common narratives and behaviours. You will also learn how to respond according to your roles and responsibilities and will be supported to use the Identification Tool.  

Who can attend? 

All professionals who may identify family violence is occurring and who engage with people in a one-off, episodic or ongoing service.

Click here for more information

As survivors, we know what could have helped us, we know what hurt us.

Efforts to protect children from abuse which do not centre the wisdom of people who were abused as children themselves are fundamentally limited in their effectiveness.

‘Emma’s Project’ was always the temporary name for a much more collective effort for the protection of children, guided by the shared wisdom of survivors of sexual abuse during childhood.

After having read every single word from every single person who responded to the survey – three times over – ACF have a roadmap forward.

It is with pride that ACF share their survivor-renamed Our Collective Experience Project, and our first report from it: Hear us now, act now.

We encourage you to download, read and share this report with people you know who may be interested in the protection of children. The content of the report which includes extensive quotes from survivors is very powerful.

But also be aware that it may affect you as you read it. Seek out support if you find that it makes you feel distressed or upset. There are helplines in the report itself.

Read report here

This 16 Days of Activism and beyond, let’s change the story and create a future where we are all safe, equal and respected.

We all deserve to be safe, equal and respected. But on average, a woman in Australia is killed by a man they know every 10 days. It doesn’t have to be this way. 

The 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence is a global campaign led annually by UN Women. It runs every year from 25 November (the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women) to 10 December (Human Rights Day).  

During the 16 Days of Activism, communities around the world join the call to prevent and eliminate violence against women and girls. 

Read more about the campaign here

No to Violence is working in partnership with Family Safety Victoria (FSV) and Victorian Aboriginal Child Care Agency (VACCA) to deliver MARAM training modules for practitioners who need to have an applied understanding of MARAM and information sharing in their roles when working with adults using family violence.

MARAM sets out the responsibilities of different workforces in identifying, assessing and managing family violence risk across the family violence and broader service system.

There will be three levels of training released over 2023-24: 

Depending on your role within an organisation, you will learn about different responsibilities and practice guides to keep perpetrators in view and accountable and to promote the safety of victim survivors of family violence.

The MARAM responsibilities decision guide provides an overview of how you may determine which level of responsibilities you hold. 

Identification module now available 

No To Violence has announced that training is now available for those workers who hold Identification responsibilities under the MARAM framework.

This training is suitable for all professionals who may identify family violence is occurring and who engage with people in a one-off, episodic or ongoing service. This training focuses on working with adults using family violence.

During this training, practitioners will learn to identify indicators for a person likely to be using family violence by observation of common narratives and behaviours. Participants will learn how to respond according to their roles and responsibilities and will be supported to use the Identification Tool.

Read more here

Djirra and Safe and Equal are working to support a culturally responsive and accountable specialist family violence sector. We want to hear from mob your views on non-Aboriginal family violence services, how they can support Aboriginal people’s choices and culture and be accountable to community.  

Your time is valuable and you will be offered $100 for your participation. 

More information here

Call or text Anna 0447 404 334 or email [email protected]

Do you work in the Victorian family violence services system? Safe and Equal together with the Monash Gender and Family Violence Prevention Centre are conducting a stocktake of client feedback processes used in family violence services.

Click here to complete the anonymous survey

In the realm of family dynamics and behaviour change, few initiatives have been as impactful as the Caring Dads program in Australia. This groundbreaking program has been making waves across the world for its innovative approach to addressing a deeply sensitive issue – assisting fathers who have used violence in rewriting their stories, to forge healthy relationships with their children. 

This intervention is underpinned by the belief that men who have used violence are capable of transformation and can become nurturing, responsible caregivers. By providing participants with a nonjudgmental, empathetic group setting for introspection and growth across 17 weeks, this approach paves the way for remarkable change. 

Read article here

While much national and international literature recognises the intersections
of family violence and sexual harm, there is as yet little research and policy within Australia generally, or within Victoria, that addresses the co-occurrence of family violence and sexual harm experienced by adult victim survivors.

This research conducted by RMIT begins to address this important evidence gap. It seeks to expand the knowledge base with respect to both the nature of victim survivor experiences of co-occurring family violence and sexual harm, as well as supporting improvement in effective service delivery within the family violence and sexual assault sectors.

Read full report here

Safe and Equal have launched a new suite of online training about pornography, young people and sexuality available through a dedicated resource hub on the It’s time we talked website.  

These resources have been developed as a part of the Addressing Pornography’s Influence Project (API) with funding from The Ian Potter Foundation and The Myer Foundation. The API project is a collaboration between Maree Crabbe (Director of It’s time we talked) and Safe and Equal. The project aims to broaden the reach and sustainability of Maree’s ground-breaking work through It’s time we talked – a violence prevention project addressing the influence of pornography on young people and how it shapes their understanding of gender, sex, sexuality and healthy relationships.  

The project has also included development of tailored video resources for Safe and Equal to use within trainings and communities of practices. The videos support us to assist prevention practitioners, particularly those working with young people, to understand how pornography contributes to young people’s sexual socialisation and reinforces the drivers of gender-based violence, and what they can do to respond. 

Read more and access training here

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